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99047 records – page 2 of 4953.

Second Foolscap Gay Oral History with Bill Atkinson

https://arquives.andornot.com/en/permalink/descriptions30847
Collection
Archives
Part Of
Foolscap Gay Oral History Project fonds
Description Level
Item
Date Range
1-8-1983
Scope and Content
SIDES A and B: In this oral history interview, Bill Atkinson, a 67 years old gay man, describes the traumatic experience of being cashiered from the navy during a period of gay witch-hunts beginning in the late 1950s. Bill describes his life before, during and after being discharged from the Navy. …
Collection
Archives
Material Type
Sound recording
Date Range
1-8-1983
Part Of
Foolscap Gay Oral History Project fonds
Fonds Number
F0083
Series Number
2
File Number
F0083-02-008
Item Number
2016-034/003
Digitized Media Type
WAV file
Scope and Content
SIDES A and B: In this oral history interview, Bill Atkinson, a 67 years old gay man, describes the traumatic experience of being cashiered from the navy during a period of gay witch-hunts beginning in the late 1950s. Bill describes his life before, during and after being discharged from the Navy. He was born in England in 1916 to a middle class family, and discusses a difficult childhood. During his time in the Navy, Bill moves between Ontario and the Pacific Northwest, occasionally travelling to Detroit to meet gay men at Bar 1011. After his career in the Navy, Bill took up modelling and acting to support himself, as well as managing a restaurant for a period of time. Bill discussed his involvement in the gay political community in Toronto, working for George Hislop’s political campaign in the 1980s. Topic discussed include the experience of being gay in the Navy, sexual harassment, mental health, financial insecurity, and gay politics in Toronto. Dates and locations discussed: Toronto, Vancouver, Detroit, England, 1950s, 1960s, 1970s, 1980s
Access Restrictions
N/A
Location - Original
Digital copy and original audio cassette. Original cassette tape located in A/V room.
Description Level
Item
Less detail

Foolscap Gay Oral History with B (tape 1 of 2)

https://arquives.andornot.com/en/permalink/descriptions30848
Collection
Archives
Part Of
Foolscap Gay Oral History Project fonds
Description Level
Item
Date Range
10-3-1986
Scope and Content
SIDE A: B discusses the various archives he has worked at, including the archives in Nova Scotia and the Ontario Archives. B came out of the closet in 1970, and became a part of the Homophile Association under the leadership of Charlie Hill. B asks about the confidentiality of the interview, and Li…
Collection
Archives
Material Type
Sound recording
Date Range
10-3-1986
Part Of
Foolscap Gay Oral History Project fonds
Fonds Number
F0083
Series Number
2
File Number
F0083-02-009
Item Number
2017-059/012
Digitized Media Type
WAV file
Physical Condition
audio good
Scope and Content
SIDE A: B discusses the various archives he has worked at, including the archives in Nova Scotia and the Ontario Archives. B came out of the closet in 1970, and became a part of the Homophile Association under the leadership of Charlie Hill. B asks about the confidentiality of the interview, and Lionel lets him know that he has ’20 years’ before the interview is released. B describes the early formation of his sexuality — particularly an obsession with watching men undress before swimming in high school. B also asserts, with a personal story, that the ‘innocence of children is a myth’. In this story, B describes him, as a youth, ‘seducing’ an older man. B believes that childhood is not idyllic; in reality, B asserts, it is full of turbulence and eroticism. B also describes being too timid for the parks, after discovering the gay cruising park scene in Hamilton, as he was aware that the parks were very dangerous. Still, B wanted to see male nudity — so, he would often visit the change rooms of sport facilities. Dates and locations discussed: Nova Scotia, Toronto, 1960s, 1970s, 1980s SIDE B: B discusses living in Hamilton, and then Ottawa, as a child. B discusses a run in with the police as a child in Ottawa. B also discusses anti-Black racism in his neighbourhood in Hamilton, and how the French were similarly impoverished and characterized as menacing in Ottawa. B then moved back to Hamilton to attend McMaster. B discusses Charlie Hill’s manner, and style of dressing. Dates and locations discussed: Ottawa, Hamilton, 1960s, 1970s, 1980s
Access Restrictions
N/A
Location - Original
CLGA only in possession of digital copy. Cassette tape retained by Lionel Collier
Description Level
Item
Less detail

Foolscap Gay Oral History with B (tape 2 of 2)

https://arquives.andornot.com/en/permalink/descriptions30849
Collection
Archives
Part Of
Foolscap Gay Oral History Project fonds
Description Level
Item
Date Range
10-3-1986
Scope and Content
SIDE C: B discusses the political atmosphere in gay activism, with increased Marxism at the University of Toronto Homophile Association under Ken Poppert. B notes that the organization was open to people of all ages, primarily targeting folks who had been in an academic setting at some time. B cont…
Collection
Archives
Material Type
Sound recording
Date Range
10-3-1986
Part Of
Foolscap Gay Oral History Project fonds
Fonds Number
F0083
Series Number
2
File Number
F0083-02-009
Item Number
2017-059/013
Digitized Media Type
WAV file
Physical Condition
audio good
Scope and Content
SIDE C: B discusses the political atmosphere in gay activism, with increased Marxism at the University of Toronto Homophile Association under Ken Poppert. B notes that the organization was open to people of all ages, primarily targeting folks who had been in an academic setting at some time. B contrasts Ian Young and Ken Poppert’s experience, and worldviews. The interview finishes approximately 10 minutes into the tape. Dates and locations discussed: Toronto, 1960s, 1970s, 1980s
Access Restrictions
N/A
Location - Original
CLGA only in possession of digital copy. Cassette tape retained by Lionel Collier
Description Level
Item
Less detail

Foolscap Gay Oral History with Clarence Barnes

https://arquives.andornot.com/en/permalink/descriptions30850
Collection
Archives
Part Of
Foolscap Gay Oral History Project fonds
Description Level
Item
Date Range
Unknown
Scope and Content
SIDE A: This interview begins as a recording of a meeting, which Lionel Collier is not in attendance of. Attendees schedule upcoming meetings, and discuss some upcoming events (lesbian film screening, the Hop dance, etc.) Clarence Barnes hands out issues of the Body Politic. Then, he hands out an a…
Collection
Archives
Material Type
Sound recording
Date Range
Unknown
Part Of
Foolscap Gay Oral History Project fonds
Fonds Number
F0083
Series Number
2
File Number
F0083-02-010
Item Number
2017-059/014
Digitized Media Type
WAV file
Physical Condition
appears good, audio good
Scope and Content
SIDE A: This interview begins as a recording of a meeting, which Lionel Collier is not in attendance of. Attendees schedule upcoming meetings, and discuss some upcoming events (lesbian film screening, the Hop dance, etc.) Clarence Barnes hands out issues of the Body Politic. Then, he hands out an article from Varsity in 1976, titled “Out of the Closet, Into the Classroom”, written by Michael Lynch discussing Clarence Barnes. Barnes announces that the purpose of the meeting was to consider gay life in the 1960s and 1970s in Toronto. Clarence first describes the meaning of Coming Out in the late 1960s. He goes on to describe the Stonewall Riots, including the demographics (most protestors were Black, Hispanic, Drag queens) and political inclinations (Marxist) of the protestors. He then discusses moving to Toronto in the 1960s. He describes various gay bars and parties at the time: Letros; Red Lion Room; St Charles; Peter Marshall’s parties. He then got involved with the Gay Liberation Movement in 1976, after meeting Jon Wixley. He describes his process of coming out, eventually leading to his coming out through the Michael Lynch article in the Varsity. He goes on to discuss Bill 7, the Memorandum Agreement for the Faculty Association, which includes clauses on protecting people from discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation, and his activism in getting the bill passed. He describes his own experiences with discrimination at the University of Toronto. He briefly describes Hanlan’s Point. He then goes on to describe how the gay neighbourhoods have changed; in particular, he describes how Queen’s Park and Philosophers Walk became less cruisey; he suggests that it has to do with lights being installed and bushes cut down. Locations and dates discussed: Toronto, New York, 1960s, 1970s, 1980s SIDE B: The question and answer period continues. An audience member, who was a part of CHAT, notes that CHAT turned around the isolation of having to go to bars to meet other queers. Barnes goes through a brief history of CHAT and the UofT Homophile Association. This includes George Hislop’s involvement. They also discuss how CHAT offered an alternative to the bar scenes. Barnes describes the Gay Liberation Movement growing out of the US Civil Right’s Movement and the Women’s Liberation Movement (Feminist Movement). He describes the movement evolving into a more clear goal in the 1970s. He then discusses the Body Politic being charged with “salacious content through mail” — and how the Body Politic being acquitted by Judge Harris. He also notes Anita Bryant’s anti-gay campaign in the late 1970s, and the ongoing Evangelical movement. Barnes encourages the meeting attendees to consider coming out, and the audience discusses their fears and concerns of doing so. Lionel notes how gay spaces have less wealth / class stratification than other spaces, and wonders if this was true in the 1960s; particularly, he wonders if there was classism at Retros and Peter Marshall’s parties. They discuss the Toronto Star and the Toronto Sun’s homophobic articles. The interview closes with Barnes’ regretting the passing of the Body Politic, and the inadequacy of Rites. Locations and dates discussed: Toronto, Ohio, 1950s, 1960s,1970s, 1980s
Access Restrictions
N/A
Location - Original
CLGA only in possession of digital copy. Cassette tape retained by Lionel Collier
Description Level
Item
Less detail

First Foolscap Gay Oral History with BC (tape 1 of 2)

https://arquives.andornot.com/en/permalink/descriptions30851
Collection
Archives
Part Of
Foolscap Gay Oral History Project fonds
Description Level
Item
Date Range
7-4-1986
Scope and Content
SIDE A: BC was born in 1929, in Fort William, Ontario. He describes his early childhood; wearing his sister’s clothing in 1935 and his family commenting on his femininity. He was very close with his mother growing up. BC’s real name is mentioned in the interview: William Edward. He goes by ‘Bill’. …
Collection
Archives
Material Type
Sound recording
Date Range
7-4-1986
Part Of
Foolscap Gay Oral History Project fonds
Fonds Number
F0083
Series Number
2
File Number
F0083-02-011
Item Number
2017-059/015
Digitized Media Type
WAV file
Physical Condition
appears good, audio fine
Scope and Content
SIDE A: BC was born in 1929, in Fort William, Ontario. He describes his early childhood; wearing his sister’s clothing in 1935 and his family commenting on his femininity. He was very close with his mother growing up. BC’s real name is mentioned in the interview: William Edward. He goes by ‘Bill’. He discusses being feminine/femme a lot of his life: he dressed up as a women at a masquerade party in 1948, and some of the men being attracted to him. A man at the ball offered to drive Bill home, Bill accepted. Driving home, they decide to drive up through the mountains. The man asked Bill if he was a man, and Bill said yes. The driver said he looks cute, and asks to have oral sex with Bill - Bill accepted. Bill describes enjoying it thoroughly, and how he ‘felt like he really loved me’. Later on, Bill met the man’s wife at a store. This made Bill feel very guilty. He also found out the man had two kids. The man to continued to ask him to have sex with him. Bill went on to work at a bank, and attempted to initiate sex with another man. This was not successful, but Bill played it off as being too drunk. Bill recalls going swimming during the Depression, and seeing other boys swimming nude and being attracted to them. An adult man noticed, and told Bill to have oral sex with him. Bill was 8 at the time. Bill was excited to do it again, but moved away and never saw him again. Bill discusses a third man he had sex with, named Dick. He also mentions another man, Elle, who Bill considered to be a ‘fruit’. Elle had a wife, but his wife knew he was gay and even knew that Bill was sleeping with him in the 1960s. Elle was also in love with Dick, and jealous of Bill’s relationship with Dick. Elle had another friend, Donnie, who was gay as well. Bill felt ‘sick’ because Donnie was so effeminate. Bill describes himself as being very cruel to Donnie. Then, the phone starts ringing. Lionel answers the phone. Dates and locations: Toronto, Fort Williams, Port Arthur, 1930s, 1940s, 1950s, 1960s SIDE B: Bill describes visiting Toronto while living in Port Arthur. He quit his job in Port Arthur and began going on lake boats. On the boats, he began meeting other men and taking them to bars and ‘whorehouses’ in Fort William. He was fearful of them discovering he was gay. He became attracted to one of the deckhands, and sees this deckhand mutually masturbating with another deckhand. Bill does not join. He quit the boat and, through the Seamen’s Union’ got a job on the DC Everest from Marathon, Ontario. BC fell in love with another man on the boat, Johnny. He confesses his love for Johnny, but Johnny rejected him. He ended up going up to another man’s room, but then rejecting this man. The next day, the other men on the boat made fun of him for spending time with the gay man (they use the term ‘crabapple’). The chef on the DC Everest takes an interest in him. The chef also mentions that the captain of the ship is interested in Bill. Bill arrives in Toronto and goes to visit his mother there; his mother had married and had three other children. A guy in his quarters invited him to show him ‘the hot spots’, including Retros, the St Charles, the Municipal, and the Bay House. Bill punched the gay in the face after seeing that the bars were ‘full of queers’. The man confesses his love for Bill. Bill tells the captain about the boy, and moved onto the Humber Dock. On the Humber Dock, he feel in love with the electrician. He would smell the electricians underwear. After the shipping season finished, he moved to St Catherine’s for the winter, where he met a man named Herbert. Herbert didn’t work, and instead lived with an older man. Bill and Herbert slept together, and Bill grew fond of him. Bill decided to move to Toronto. Herbert took Bill to Letros. In Toronto, Bill “broke into the gay life”. Bill moved into a home with a group of other queer people, by Park Plaza. One of his housemates, Kit, fell in love with Bill. Dates and locations discussed: 1950s, 1960s, Toronto, St. Catharines, Marathon, Fort William, Ontario
Access Restrictions
N/A
Location - Original
CLGA only in possession of digital copy. Cassette tape retained by Lionel Collier
Description Level
Item
Less detail

First Foolscap Gay Oral History with BC (tape 2 of 2)

https://arquives.andornot.com/en/permalink/descriptions30852
Collection
Archives
Part Of
Foolscap Gay Oral History Project fonds
Description Level
Item
Date Range
7-4-1986
Scope and Content
SIDE C: Bill describes Kit as possessive, and says he did not love him. AS a result, Kit kicked him out, and Bill moved to a place in Yorkville. Bill’s experience with Kit made him ‘lose faith in the gay life’. In his new home, Merle, a housemate, confessed his love for Bill. Also, Bill met a man a…
Collection
Archives
Material Type
Sound recording
Date Range
7-4-1986
Part Of
Foolscap Gay Oral History Project fonds
Fonds Number
F0083
Series Number
2
File Number
F0083-02-011
Item Number
2017-059/016
Digitized Media Type
WAV file
Physical Condition
appears good, audio fine
Scope and Content
SIDE C: Bill describes Kit as possessive, and says he did not love him. AS a result, Kit kicked him out, and Bill moved to a place in Yorkville. Bill’s experience with Kit made him ‘lose faith in the gay life’. In his new home, Merle, a housemate, confessed his love for Bill. Also, Bill met a man at the King Cole Room named Paul, a lawyer, who asked Bill to live with him. Bill ran into Paul sleeping with a woman, and decided to move out. Bill moved into another man’s home, Lorne, down the hall from Paul, but he was uninterested in Lorne. He then met another man in the King Cole Room. He mentions wasting 10 years of his life with a man named Nuell (sp?) who was older than him. They stayed together until Nuell died. He also describes his experiences with alcoholism, and quitting drinking with Alcoholics Anonymous. Bill feels sadness about the gay community in the 1980s. He describes the St Charles as dreadful, and full of loneliness. He then describes some of the drag queens at the Bay House: Peggy O’Neill, and Geraldine. He describes them as ‘tough’. He never got into any fights, but he feels that gay men were ‘tough’ in those days. He discusses his sobriety, and the impact it has on his sex life. Dates and locations discussed: 1960s, 1970s, 1980s, Toronto SIDE D: The archivist notes that the date recorded on this tape seems to be incorrect. The recording picks up mid-sentence, discussing someone named Michael who has been phoning BC Bill discusses Paul: Paul got married, and moved to England. It is rumoured that Paul passed away. He also mentions that Kit moved to Florida. Bill says he could never sleep with close friends, Collier says that doing that is ‘what friends are for’. Bill discusses visiting the Romans, his first and only experience in the baths; Bill met someone who was nice there, but he did not take him home. He describes feeling ‘guilty’ after visiting the bathhouse. He discusses lesser known parks for curising, specifically a park near Lawrence station in Toronto (possibly Muir Gardens?). He slept with a priest that he met in this park. He also mentions that he has a partner, John, at the time of the interview, but he feels uncertain if John loves him. He mentions that he is not interested in younger men, and does not do the Grosvenor strip. Bill also expresses his attraction to Lionel Collier, the interviewer. Bill discusses Peter Marshall. He met Peter Marshall through Letros. The audio is interrupted at this point (approx 20 min in). The audio returns with Bill continuing his description of Peter Marshall. Bill also discusses his experience coming out to his aunt, and his experiences with alcohol. He also discusses an altercation with the police, and the murder and investigation of his friend Jim Taylor, who was beaten to death by baseball bat 12 years prior to Interview. He discusses the murder of his other friend, Jimmy McIntyre, and the suicide of his friend Ray. Dates and locations discussed: 1970s, 1980s, Toronto
Access Restrictions
N/A
Location - Original
CLGA only in possession of digital copy. Cassette tape retained by Lionel Collier
Description Level
Item
Less detail

Second Foolscap Gay Oral History with BC

https://arquives.andornot.com/en/permalink/descriptions30853
Collection
Archives
Part Of
Foolscap Gay Oral History Project fonds
Description Level
Item
Date Range
19-4-1986
Scope and Content
SIDE A: This recording begins with loud classical music. Bill discusses his definition of community - BC describes there definitely being a sense of gay community now, ‘like the Greenwich Village of Toronto- ‘Even the people who are not gay respect the gay people’. He mentions how in the 1950s, the…
Collection
Archives
Material Type
Sound recording
Date Range
19-4-1986
Part Of
Foolscap Gay Oral History Project fonds
Fonds Number
F0083
Series Number
2
File Number
F0083-02-012
Item Number
2017-059/017
Digitized Media Type
WAV file
Physical Condition
appears good, audio fine
Scope and Content
SIDE A: This recording begins with loud classical music. Bill discusses his definition of community - BC describes there definitely being a sense of gay community now, ‘like the Greenwich Village of Toronto- ‘Even the people who are not gay respect the gay people’. He mentions how in the 1950s, the gay community existed on indoors (in bars like the St Charles). He also mentions that earlier, people mostly used the term ‘homo’; he believes ‘fag’ to be much ore recent. But, he also admits he knows very little about gay life. He mentions the term “Mary”, and how all gay men were given women’s name; he was called “Desiree”. He also discusses the tough people at the bars. He describes the formation of cliques; his own circle became known as having a ‘superiority complex’. He also mentions meeting his first lesbian in Toronto, and a lesbian he met at the Liquor Lodge. But, he also feels the lesbian community is very violent. He discusses being employed at a hospital, and his experiences with unemployment. He also believes his grandfather may have been gay. He references the book “The Homosexual in History”. He also mentions Rock Hudson’s death. Dates and locations discussed: 1950s, 1960s, 1970s, 1980s, Toronto SIDE B: Bill discusses bisexuality, and his ex-lover Nuell (sp?) no believing in bisexual people. He also cites Da Vinci as proof that ‘there is more to homosexuality than just sex’. He describes feeling guilty, and that his parents must have been embarrassed that he is gay. He mentions his alcoholism stemming from his shame. He also describes hating the bathhouses, and feeling that bathhouse owners exploited gay people to ‘rule to world’. He also criticizes exhibitionists, and suggests that the hinder the assimilation of gay people into straight society. He discusses some other gay spots: Hanlan’s Point, Queen’s park, Philosopher’s Walk, Park Plaza, Palmer’s Drug Store. He mentions he doesn’t feel he needs straight friends, but feels proud and happy that there are straight people who accept him. Bill and Collier look through some photographs, and then Collier takes photographs of Bill and Bill’s apartment. Dates and locations discussed: Toronto, 1970s, 1980s
Access Restrictions
N/A
Location - Original
CLGA only in possession of digital copy. Cassette tape retained by Lionel Collier
Description Level
Item
Less detail

Foolscap Gay Oral History with Bill Beatty

https://arquives.andornot.com/en/permalink/descriptions30854
Collection
Archives
Part Of
Foolscap Gay Oral History Project fonds
Description Level
Item
Date Range
12-3-1983
Scope and Content
SIDE A: The archivist believes that this portion of the interview was conducted by a different interviewer, not Lionel Collier. Bill Beatty grew up Protestant and Anglican. Bill first realized he was gay when he was 8 or 9, due to ‘a relationship with an uncle’. Bill is still reluctant to come out …
Collection
Archives
Material Type
Sound recording
Date Range
12-3-1983
Part Of
Foolscap Gay Oral History Project fonds
Fonds Number
F0083
Series Number
2
File Number
F0083-02-013
Item Number
2017-059/018
Digitized Media Type
WAV file
Physical Condition
audio good
Scope and Content
SIDE A: The archivist believes that this portion of the interview was conducted by a different interviewer, not Lionel Collier. Bill Beatty grew up Protestant and Anglican. Bill first realized he was gay when he was 8 or 9, due to ‘a relationship with an uncle’. Bill is still reluctant to come out to his mother. Bill’s mother was sick when he was growing up, and he took care of her most of his youth. At time of interview, Bill is working for Toronto Hydro. Bill Beatty mentions that moving to Toronto, the gay areas then ‘are the same areas now’ — including the Village, and on Grosvenor. He struggled, being poor and living in the city. Upon first moving to Toronto, Bill drove around cruising but had very little success. Bill feels unsafe bringing guys home, or going anywhere with them. Bill discusses his own experiences paying for sex. Bill discusses his relationship struggles, and one night stands. Bill is now a member of the Metropolitan Community Church of Toronto. Dates and locations discussed: 1980s, Toronto SIDE B: Bill discusses no longer going to bars because he feels ‘they are nothing more than glorified meat racks’. He talks about his friends, both straight and gay, and how they respond to his being queer. Bill discusses methods of acquiring gay men’s magazines and pornography, and the various regulations. The interviewer and Bill discuss the regulations on pornography contemporary to the interview. Dates and locations discussed: 1980s, Toronto
Access Restrictions
N/A
Location - Original
CLGA only in possession of digital copy. Cassette tape retained by Lionel Collier
Description Level
Item
Less detail

Foolscap Gay Oral History with Jack Bell

https://arquives.andornot.com/en/permalink/descriptions30855
Collection
Archives
Part Of
Foolscap Gay Oral History Project fonds
Description Level
Item
Date Range
10-3-1983
Scope and Content
SIDE A: Interview opens up with Jack Bell discussing his parents. His mother is from Toronto, and his father from southwestern Ontario. Jack Bell was born on May 25, 1935, and has one sister. His parents have a 20 year age difference. Jack’s father worked at the CNE. Jack also discusses his child, …
Collection
Archives
Material Type
Sound recording
Date Range
10-3-1983
Part Of
Foolscap Gay Oral History Project fonds
Fonds Number
F0083
Series Number
2
File Number
F0083-02-014
Item Number
2017-059/019
Digitized Media Type
WAV file
Physical Condition
audio good
Scope and Content
SIDE A: Interview opens up with Jack Bell discussing his parents. His mother is from Toronto, and his father from southwestern Ontario. Jack Bell was born on May 25, 1935, and has one sister. His parents have a 20 year age difference. Jack’s father worked at the CNE. Jack also discusses his child, and his two previous marriages with women. Jack does not believe that gay life was ‘very happy’. Jack has lived in New York City, and Toronto. Dates and locations discussed: New York City, Toronto, 1940s, 1950s, 1960s, 1970s, 1980s SIDE B: Jack discusses his father not knowing about ‘homosexual’ or ‘gay folks’ while he was growing up. But, he recalls people using the word ‘queer’ as a derogatory slur, and him being referred to as a ‘sensitive kid’. As a kid, Jack’s teachers encouraged him to pursue the arts. Jack discusses his father’s struggle with knowing his kid was a creative, and overcoming that. Jack further describes his experience marrying his second wife, and also the expectations of the church. Jack also describes his coming out process, including coming out to a secretary from his work and coming out to his wife. Jack also discusses the differences between house parties and bars and clubs as a teen. Jack discusses the social structure of gay life, which he believes to be largely tied to income and material assets. Lionel dissects Jack’s characterization of gay social structures, and contrasts it against John Grube’s theories. Jack describes the vanity of gay life, and that the ‘cult of youth’ has always preoccupied gay life. Jack describes that, in the 1950s, there was genuinely a large age difference within many gay couples. But, he feels, beyond 1-7 years, one can get into the problems that his parents (who were 20 years apart) dealt with. Jack also discusses being picked up by men in bars, in New York and Toronto. Jack and Lionel discuss various gay authors, including John Lee and Don Clark. Bell discusses a police encounter, at age 19, while cruising in Union Station. Jack also discusses how there is more ‘fraternization’ between gay men and lesbian women at the time of interview than there was in the 1950s and 1960s. Dates and locations discussed: New York City, Toronto, 1940s, 1950s, 1960s, 1970s, 1980s
Access Restrictions
N/A
Location - Original
CLGA only in possession of digital copy. Cassette tape retained by Lionel Collier
Description Level
Item
Less detail

Foolscap Gay Oral History with BEW

https://arquives.andornot.com/en/permalink/descriptions30856
Collection
Archives
Part Of
Foolscap Gay Oral History Project fonds
Description Level
Item
Date Range
13-3-1983
Scope and Content
SIDE A: BEW discusses cruising, and cruising in groups. He discusses the nature of gay relationships — feeling that he has an easier time building friendships with gay men than long lasting romantic relationships. He recounts visiting Detroit and going to gay bars there (as the drinking age was low…
Collection
Archives
Material Type
Sound recording
Date Range
13-3-1983
Part Of
Foolscap Gay Oral History Project fonds
Fonds Number
F0083
Series Number
2
File Number
F0083-02-015
Item Number
2017-059/020
Digitized Media Type
WAV file
Physical Condition
audio good
Scope and Content
SIDE A: BEW discusses cruising, and cruising in groups. He discusses the nature of gay relationships — feeling that he has an easier time building friendships with gay men than long lasting romantic relationships. He recounts visiting Detroit and going to gay bars there (as the drinking age was lower in the states). BEW also feels when he was in the States, he had the opportunity to behave more freely. While at one of these bars in Detroit, two straight men convinced BEW to go home with them. While in their car, the two mean beat up BEW and stole his money. Lionel and BEW discuss the types of language popular at the time — both for gay men, and also for queer women. BEW discuss parties vs. clubs at that time. Dates and locations discussed: Toronto, 1970s, 1980s SIDE B: BEW discusses being "framed" by a student, while working as a teacher, for touching a young person’s genitals. Since BEW signed a document confessing to the crime, BEW could not avoid being convicted. BEW experienced significant social ostracization after his conviction. BEW then lost his teaching license, and has not worked in social work or teaching in 1976. BEW was blackballed, and struggled heavily with employment. BEW separated from his wife in 1978. BEW has a daughter. The content of this interview is near identical to the interview with Ken Fraser by John Grube in 1984. Dates and locations discussed: Toronto, 1970s, 1980s
Access Restrictions
N/A
Location - Original
CLGA only in possession of digital copy. Cassette tape retained by Lionel Collier
Description Level
Item
Less detail

Foolscap Gay Oral History with BH (tape 1 of 2)

https://arquives.andornot.com/en/permalink/descriptions30857
Collection
Archives
Part Of
Foolscap Gay Oral History Project fonds
Description Level
Item
Date Range
4-8-1985
Scope and Content
SIDE A: Recording begins mid BH’s explanation of why he moved to Toronto from Winnipeg in 1964 in search of gay community. BH mentions a particular gay beer parlour, at the Marlborough Hotel in Winnipeg, and using the parlour as a way to make gay contacts. BH say he always knew he was not heterosex…
Collection
Archives
Material Type
Sound recording
Date Range
4-8-1985
Part Of
Foolscap Gay Oral History Project fonds
Fonds Number
F0083
Series Number
2
File Number
F0083-02-016
Item Number
2017-059/021
Digitized Media Type
WAV file
Physical Condition
recording begins with BH mid sentence. Audio good
Scope and Content
SIDE A: Recording begins mid BH’s explanation of why he moved to Toronto from Winnipeg in 1964 in search of gay community. BH mentions a particular gay beer parlour, at the Marlborough Hotel in Winnipeg, and using the parlour as a way to make gay contacts. BH say he always knew he was not heterosexual, and began to understand that he was gay and how to make gay contacts when he was 18 or 19. While BH was at university, he had a summer job in Calgary he developed a strong crush on another man, through whom he met an older man (~40) in Winnipeg that introduced BH to a ‘secret’ gay community back home. BH discusses his service in the army, but did not meet many gay men while serving. BH also discusses another relationship with a man, Ron, in Winnipeg, who he lived with for 5 years. BH met Ron at the YMCA in Winnipeg. After their breakup, Ron moved to Vancouver and BH moved to Toronto (in 1964). BH discusses various cruising spots in Winnipeg, including a seedy bathhouse called the ‘Blue Lagoon,’ (an alias for the Alexander Steambath) and “Oby’s” (sp?). dates and locations discussed: Winnipeg, Toronto, Calgary, 1950s, 1960s SIDE B: BH discusses with Lionel the impact of coming out on encouraging others to come out, particularly family members. BH teaches at Ryerson, at the School of Social Work. At the time of interview, he is on sabbatical, working on developing courses on working with gay clients, and continuing education of working with gay people. The project was inspired by his visit to Glad Day Bookstore, and led to BH coming out at work. BH believes he de facto came out by telling his family about the project, and felt that reactions were neither shocked nor interested. BH is also working on a conference on aging held by the organization ‘Gays in Healthcare’. BH discusses the different gay venues he visited in the 1950s in Toronto, including Letros, the Parkside, Malloney’s, the King Cole Room, and Chez Paree by the Philosopher’s Walk. Chez Paree’s maitre d’ (George Barry) was a social butterfly, and gay — making it a more upscale gay restaurant (BH mentions it was quite expensive). BH also discusses steambaths, including the Oakleaf, the Barracks, and the Sanitarium. Dates and locations discussed: Toronto, 1950s, 1970s, 1980s
Access Restrictions
N/A
Location - Original
CLGA only in possession of digital copy. Cassette tape retained by Lionel Collier
Description Level
Item
Less detail

Foolscap Gay Oral History with BH (tape 2 of 2)

https://arquives.andornot.com/en/permalink/descriptions30858
Collection
Archives
Part Of
Foolscap Gay Oral History Project fonds
Description Level
Item
Date Range
4-8-1985
Scope and Content
SIDE C: BH discusses the how the bathhouse raids in 1981 ‘really got him’. BH wrote a letter of protest on behalf of Ryerson to the commissioner of the police, and to multiple politicians (incl. the mayor, and attorney general). This was the first ‘open thing’ BH did at work. BH also brought up the…
Collection
Archives
Material Type
Sound recording
Date Range
4-8-1985
Part Of
Foolscap Gay Oral History Project fonds
Fonds Number
F0083
Series Number
2
File Number
F0083-02-016
Item Number
2017-059/022
Digitized Media Type
WAV file
Physical Condition
audio good
Scope and Content
SIDE C: BH discusses the how the bathhouse raids in 1981 ‘really got him’. BH wrote a letter of protest on behalf of Ryerson to the commissioner of the police, and to multiple politicians (incl. the mayor, and attorney general). This was the first ‘open thing’ BH did at work. BH also brought up the raids with the Professional Association of Social Workers, who also penned a letter of protest, which they published in their publication. BH discusses psychiatry and psychology as an industry, and his issues with it and it’s history. BH and Lionel discuss straight reactionaries to the gay rights movement, and feelings of being ‘threatened’ by the gay liberation movement amongst many straight people. BH feels that many gay people share similar sentiments. BH references the writings of Jeffery Weeks and Kenneth Plummer. Dates and locations discussed: Toronto, 1980s SIDE B: BH and Lionel close up the last few sentences from the previous side of the tape, and say farewells.
Access Restrictions
N/A
Location - Original
CLGA only in possession of digital copy. Cassette tape retained by Lionel Collier
Description Level
Item
Less detail

First Foolscap Gay Oral History with Elgin Blair and Richard Brown

https://arquives.andornot.com/en/permalink/descriptions30859
Collection
Archives
Part Of
Foolscap Gay Oral History Project fonds
Description Level
Item
Date Range
7-11-1982
Scope and Content
SIDES A and B: In this oral history interview Elgin Blair and Richard Brown discuss their lives in Toronto as gay men. The interview begins with Elgin (58 years old) commenting on his coming out experience, his puritanical upbringing, his struggle to accept his homosexuality, time in service during…
Collection
Archives
Material Type
Sound recording
Date Range
7-11-1982
Part Of
Foolscap Gay Oral History Project fonds
Fonds Number
F0083
Series Number
2
File Number
F0083-02-017
Item Number
2016-034/005
Digitized Media Type
WAV file
Physical Condition
appear good, audio good
Scope and Content
SIDES A and B: In this oral history interview Elgin Blair and Richard Brown discuss their lives in Toronto as gay men. The interview begins with Elgin (58 years old) commenting on his coming out experience, his puritanical upbringing, his struggle to accept his homosexuality, time in service during the war, radical consciousness, and his work in the Unitarian gay caucus. Other topics include gay social structure in Toronto in the 1950s, gay bars, and Elgin’s involvement in the gay liberation movement and gay organizations such as CHAT, The Body Politic, Older Gay Association, and the Gays and Lesbians against Disarmament (GLAD), as well as in the CCF. Elgin also discusses how bars and pubs, and the people who met there, were instrumental in his coping with depression and sexual orientation. Richard Brown joins the conversation in the second half of the interview. He discusses the important role of gay business like bars and baths in the building of the gay community. He also comments on his personal life, growing up, coming out experience, and involvement in Lambda. Dates and locations discussed: Toronto, 1950s, 1960s, 1970s, 1980s
Access Restrictions
N/A
Location - Original
Digital copy and original audio cassette. Original cassette tape located in A/V room.
Description Level
Item
Less detail
Collection
Archives
Part Of
Foolscap Gay Oral History Project fonds
Description Level
Item
Date Range
20-3-1983
Scope and Content
Transcript available; see F0083-03-004 Transcript of Interview with Elgin Blair and Richard Brown In this oral history interview Elgin Blair and Richard Brown discuss their lives in Toronto as gay men. The interview begins with Elgin (58 years old) commenting on his coming out experience, his purit…
Collection
Archives
Material Type
Sound recording
Date Range
20-3-1983
Part Of
Foolscap Gay Oral History Project fonds
Fonds Number
F0083
Series Number
2
File Number
F0083-02-018
Item Number
2016-034/006
Digitized Media Type
WAV file
Physical Condition
good
Scope and Content
Transcript available; see F0083-03-004 Transcript of Interview with Elgin Blair and Richard Brown In this oral history interview Elgin Blair and Richard Brown discuss their lives in Toronto as gay men. The interview begins with Elgin (58 years old) commenting on his coming out experience, his puritanical upbringing, his struggle to accept his homosexuality, time in service during the war, radical consciousness, and his work in the Unitarian gay caucus. Other topics include gay social structure in Toronto in the 1950s, gay bars, and Elgin’s involvement in the gay liberation movement and gay organizations such as CHAT, The Body Politic, Older Gay Association, and the Gays and Lesbians against Disarmament (GLAD), as well as in the CCF. Elgin also discusses how bars and pubs, and the people who met there, were instrumental in his coping with depression and sexual orientation. Richard Brown joins the conversation in the second half of the interview. He discusses the important role of gay business like bars and baths in the building of the gay community. He also comments on his personal life, growing up, coming out experience, and involvement in Lambda. Dates and locations discussed: Toronto, 1950s, 1960s, 1970s, 1980s
Access Restrictions
N/A
Location - Original
Digital copy and original audio cassette. Original cassette tape located in A/V room.
Description Level
Item
Less detail
Collection
Archives
Part Of
Foolscap Gay Oral History Project fonds
Description Level
Item
Date Range
20-3-1983
Scope and Content
Transcript available; see F0083-03-004 Transcript of Interview with Elgin Blair and Richard Brown. In this oral history interview Elgin Blair and Richard Brown discuss their lives in Toronto as gay men. The interview begins with Elgin (58 years old) commenting on his coming out experience, his puri…
Collection
Archives
Material Type
Sound recording
Date Range
20-3-1983
Part Of
Foolscap Gay Oral History Project fonds
Fonds Number
F0083
Series Number
2
File Number
F0083-02-018
Item Number
2016-034/006
Digitized Media Type
WAV file
Physical Condition
audio is okay
Scope and Content
Transcript available; see F0083-03-004 Transcript of Interview with Elgin Blair and Richard Brown. In this oral history interview Elgin Blair and Richard Brown discuss their lives in Toronto as gay men. The interview begins with Elgin (58 years old) commenting on his coming out experience, his puritanical upbringing, his struggle to accept his homosexuality, time in service during the war, radical consciousness, and his work in the Unitarian gay caucus. Other topics include gay social structure in Toronto in the 1950s, gay bars, and Elgin’s involvement in the gay liberation movement and gay organizations such as CHAT, The Body Politic, Older Gay Association, and the Gays and Lesbians against Disarmament (GLAD), as well as in the CCF. Elgin also discusses how bars and pubs, and the people who met there, were instrumental in his coping with depression and sexual orientation. Richard Brown joins the conversation in the second half of the interview. He discusses the important role of gay business like bars and baths in the building of the gay community. He also comments on his personal life, growing up, coming out experience, and involvement in Lambda. Dates and locations discussed: Toronto, 1950s, 1960s, 1970s, 1980s
Access Restrictions
N/A
Location - Original
Digital copy and original audio cassette. Original cassette tape located in A/V room.
Description Level
Item
Less detail

Foolscap Gay Oral History with Peter Bochove and Arthur Whitaker (tape 1 of 2)

https://arquives.andornot.com/en/permalink/descriptions30862
Collection
Archives
Part Of
Foolscap Gay Oral History Project fonds
Description Level
Item
Date Range
26-8-1986
Scope and Content
SIDE A: Arthur Whitaker and Peter Bochove are both business partners. They met through the bathhouse at 5 Wellesley St West, the Library Health Club, previously managed by Brandy Knight. Brandy Knight also owned August Club - another gay club, on the top of Parkside, which ran from late 1969-72). T…
Collection
Archives
Material Type
Sound recording
Date Range
26-8-1986
Part Of
Foolscap Gay Oral History Project fonds
Fonds Number
F0083
Series Number
2
File Number
F0083-02-019
Item Number
2017-059/023
Digitized Media Type
WAV file
Physical Condition
tape, audio both in good condition
Scope and Content
SIDE A: Arthur Whitaker and Peter Bochove are both business partners. They met through the bathhouse at 5 Wellesley St West, the Library Health Club, previously managed by Brandy Knight. Brandy Knight also owned August Club - another gay club, on the top of Parkside, which ran from late 1969-72). Throughout this interview, the audio repeated cuts due to the interviewee’s phone ring. The two first describe how they met. Peter first approached by Whitaker in 1973, after attending the Health Club regularly. Whitaker describes his involvement in CHAtT. He first joined in 1971/1972 - the same time he came out of the closet. He used CHAT to meet other gay men through the dances they held at Holy Trinity Church. Whitaker first heard about CHAT through television, and he chose to attend there as he found the Parkside/St Charles ‘terribly intimidating’. Bochove goes on to describe the Richmond Street Baths. He describes his investment into Richmond Street Health Emporium ‘a mistake,’ as it was ‘way ahead of its time’ The baths were about 16 000 square feet, with pools, atrium, etc. To open it, he scouted out wealthy gay men at Quest to invest, ended up with 17 shareholders. He found straight investors easier to work with than gay investors, as he felt queers invested in gay businesses with a closer connection to the social and sexual profits with the investment than purely financial. The baths were destroyed during the Bathhouse Raids; they pull out pictures of the destroyed bathhouse to show Lionel. Bochove was president of the Richmond street Health Emporium until then, 1981. After the raids, the Richmond closed due to bankruptcy. Bochove describes his reaction on the day of Operation Soap/the Bathhouse Raids. At the time of raids, Bochove was working at Katrina’s, and involved in Barracks - so he was involved in 3/4 of the baths attacked. Bochove describes police harassment, and the police asking neighbours if he brought young boys home. Bochove also says he was tipped off that his mail was being intercepted and tampered with. He says that the police surprised by level of organization of response, and after trying second, less discreet Backdoor raids, still got a strong and visible response. Bochove talks about Bob Slea, and describes him as a a ‘total scumbag’, pickpocket, bicycle theft, and paedophile. He notes that Slea runs escort agency advertised in Now Mag. Note that Collier later interviews Slea, and this is also part of the Foolscap fond. Bochove sites the Hassle Free Clinic to show that he believes those who use the baths practice safe sex or abstain from anal sex. However, does note that the Roman does not give out condoms or acknowledge patrons are having sex there. Also Bochove notes that the Oakleaf was never noted as a gay place nor raided, while it was as ‘gay as the rest of them.’ When it came to his baths, Bochove feels it was important to outwardly state that they were gay. Whitaker notes that Malloney ‘brought the baths into the 20th century’ with Club Toronto, running gay movies, having an orgy room and acknowledging the gay clientele. Whitaker leaves the room (approx 30 min), and Bochove begins to recount his early childhood. Bochove was born in Holland, just outside the Hague. He lived in Guelph,and then in Downsview - this is where Bochove first discovered the baths. His first ever gay experience happened while he was asleep, camping with a friend - he woke up to see his friend giving him oral sex (at age 16/17). In 1971, Bochove began working for the Department of National Defence. Around this time, he went into the Roman baths to get a massage, and only after entering discovered it was a gay steambath. He was offered his money back, but decided to stay (age 21). Met a student there from the University of Guelph. Two weeks later, he went back. A month later, he discovered the Library Health Club - began going every Friday night, where he met Whitaker. Whitaker was always rude to Bochove, but they grew to be friends. Bochove is sober, he quit drinking in 1970 (after acknowledging his own gay identity), and hated the Manatee. Whitaker invited him to the Toronto Club baths, where he met Peter Malloney - began going regularly. Malloney offered Bochove a job to manage his club, and through that job he fell in love with gay business. He believes that at this time (in 1973) gay business was a new phenomena. Dates and locations mentioned: Toronto, Guelph, Downsview, The Hague, Holland, Netherlands, 1970s, 1980s SIDE B: Bochove recounts Feb 2, 1983 - seeing the space that later became Malloney’s as a gutted out, destroyed place. He gathered ‘every drag queen I know’ to clean the space. He passed out 5,000 invitations, and opened up Malloney’s on Feb 10. He describes their being lines from Grenville and Elizabeth up to Bay St. Bochove’s describes his business theory - people who come into them except friendly, courteous service and fair drinks and fair price. He describes Malloney’s daily clientele; he ran lunches during the day, had a large lesbian patronage from 7:00 to 9:00 PM, and then around 8:30 to 9:00, people came in wanting to find seats. He describes the various bars Bochove renovated and opened with Maloney across the street. He particularly describes Murphy’s, which had him ’strung out’ Bochove goes on to discuss the importance of safe sex as the ‘cure for AIDS’ and frustration with the Romans bathhouse for not giving condoms out - he also applauds Club Toronto for giving condoms out. He discusses the Parkside and St Charles Tavern’s business fading away, and mentions the Quest as a place of steady business. He describes the financial position of Richmond Health and why it went bankrupt after the Raids. Bochove goes on to predict that’ “in the next 10 years, there will be a 100 gay bars in the city. He suspects that the HIV/AIDS crisis will contribute to this, with many gay men migrating to Toronto. He describes that, outside of Toronto, ‘gay means death’. Bochove mentions that he was in a 6 year monogamous relationship for the entire time he worked in the baths. Dates and locations mentioned: Toronto, 1980s
Access Restrictions
N/A
Location - Original
CLGA only in possession of digital copy. Cassette tape retained by Lionel Collier
Description Level
Item
Less detail

Foolscap Gay Oral History with Peter Bochove and Arthur Whitaker (tape 2 of 2)

https://arquives.andornot.com/en/permalink/descriptions30863
Collection
Archives
Part Of
Foolscap Gay Oral History Project fonds
Description Level
Item
Date Range
26-8-1986
Scope and Content
SIDE C: Bochove describes knowing his gay as early as 1968, but he was also an alcoholic and “when I was drunk, I wasn’t anything. Wasn’t homosexual, wasn’t heterosexual’. Also, he did not how to act on his gay sexual urges. Bochove went to Westview Centennial school. In 1970, he started working at…
Collection
Archives
Material Type
Sound recording
Date Range
26-8-1986
Part Of
Foolscap Gay Oral History Project fonds
Fonds Number
F0083
Series Number
2
File Number
F0083-02-019
Item Number
2017-059/024
Digitized Media Type
WAV file
Physical Condition
tape, audio both in good condition
Scope and Content
SIDE C: Bochove describes knowing his gay as early as 1968, but he was also an alcoholic and “when I was drunk, I wasn’t anything. Wasn’t homosexual, wasn’t heterosexual’. Also, he did not how to act on his gay sexual urges. Bochove went to Westview Centennial school. In 1970, he started working at CanEx. His first sexual encounters and ‘coming out’ was through bathhouses. Bochove mentions George Hislop and George Shear as “breaking a lot of ground” for him and other gay men. He goes on to describes the Richmond Street Health Emporium, down to the size of rooms, number of staff and the minutiae of the placement of dimmer switches. Bochove mentions that received permission from the police (until three years before the bathhouse raids) to show ‘hardcore’ gay male porn at the Richmond. Tape closes with Bochove a listing a group of other people Lionel should interview. He also mentions not barring women, and his donating to the Zodiac leading to a large lesbian clientele He also mentions having a straight clientele who believed ‘gay places are more fun’ Bochove states he ‘does not believe in creating a gay space’ regarding bars: there is no real difference gay or straight’ but does note that ‘you don’t get the same amount of violence at a gay place’ Dates and locations discussed: 1960s, 1970s, 1980s, Toronto
Access Restrictions
N/A
Location - Original
CLGA only in possession of digital copy. Cassette tape retained by Lionel Collier
Description Level
Item
Less detail

Foolscap Gay Oral History with Tony Brady (tape 1 of 3)

https://arquives.andornot.com/en/permalink/descriptions30864
Collection
Archives
Part Of
Foolscap Gay Oral History Project fonds
Description Level
Item
Date Range
26-2-1986
Scope and Content
SIDE A: This tape is very inaudible at beginning, audio comes back at 3mins, but cuts in and out. Tony Brady was born in Quebec in 1934. As a child, Tony Brady remembers rumours about a ‘hermaphrodite’ in Drummondville, who lived with a very effeminate man. TB also remembers, in school, a young boy…
Collection
Archives
Material Type
Sound recording
Date Range
26-2-1986
Part Of
Foolscap Gay Oral History Project fonds
Fonds Number
F0083
Series Number
2
File Number
F0083-02-020
Item Number
2017-059/025
Digitized Media Type
WAV file
Physical Condition
audio good
Scope and Content
SIDE A: This tape is very inaudible at beginning, audio comes back at 3mins, but cuts in and out. Tony Brady was born in Quebec in 1934. As a child, Tony Brady remembers rumours about a ‘hermaphrodite’ in Drummondville, who lived with a very effeminate man. TB also remembers, in school, a young boy who he believed was definitely gay. TB was raised religiously as an Irish Catholic, one of four living siblings. TB remembers his first experiences at age 4, with boys, girls and both. TB remembers his experiences with the boys as pleasurable, but with the girls not. While TB feels that his parents may be accepting of his sexuality, he feels he has never had any opportunity to discuss it and also does not believe he needs to talk about his sexuality with others. TB mentions that a lot of people really don’t know whether or not someone’s gay - and doesn’t really see why anyone should come out to all the people you know. He believes social norms exist, and one should live within them for comfort. Growing up, Tony’ss sister used the word queer, or faggot - but did not hear the word ‘gay’ until later in life. Tony left Drummondville high school to attend “Elle’s Business College” (sp?), and then moved to Toronto and took a hairdressing course. TB also took courses in tailoring, cooking, sign language, etc. TB mentions using all of these when he had his television show - particularly sign language as the show was for the hearing impaired. TB discusses his own trepidations about having sex with other men as a teen, despite understanding the ‘straight concept of gays’. Still TB wasn’t aware that Drummondville was ‘so gay,’ noting that, at time of interview, Drummondville had a gay club. TB’s early relationships were very romantically driven - even if they did not come to fruition or TB did not feel he was able to pursue his romantic interests. TB met a boy named “Ding” or “Bing” (sp?) who was in the Canadian Armed Forces as a medic, with whom he had a couple unsuccessful sexual attempts, and also who would not allow TB to see other men. After arriving in England, TB met a gay man the second day he was there. TB was age 22, and this man was 24. The two men lived together in London, then travelled through Europe and then on a boat that eventually resulted in the two immigrating to Durban, South Africa. But TB found this man too uptight to ever express interest in defining themselves as a relationship. TB continued to have relationships and travelled. Dates and actions discussed: 1930s, 1940s, 1950s, 1960s, Toronto, Drummondville, Quebec, Durban, South Africa, London, Europe SIDE B: TB recounts a story of a tumultuous relationship with a partner who he also ran various business with, including a hair salon. Upon returning to Toronto, despite being underage TB was able to alter the birth date on his drivers license. TB mentions Letros, and specifically Peter Marshall as a celebrity frequenter of the bar, and a particular friend of Peter who murdered his wife and was sent to his prison. TB discusses ‘queen status’ - with a ‘queen’s court’ and specific queens having relations with particular bars. TB discusses Geraldine, Roxanna, among others, and Francis (whom he refers to as ‘Coloured Francis”). Queen’s who’d have their ‘old men’ - which were less ‘old’ because of their age, but because they were uncomfortable with their queerness or attraction to men. TB feels that Halloween has fallen apart, and also notes that back then, queer relationships between two men or two women were usually ‘butches and bitches’ or ‘butches and femmes’. Peter, as a queen, was ‘not like these other queens’ - despite putting on the makeup and having an entourage due to his wealth, he was low-key and pleasant and was always in a relationship, differentiating him from other queens. TB brings up a particular queen, Max Axler (sp?) with a black man named Johnny Winn (sp?). While at Retros, Max would have his own glass checked behind the bar, and would wear short shorts and go up to George Letros’s cottage on the weekend. Johnny and Max were very campy, and minor celebrities. The first gay party TB ever went to was at Max Axler’s home, during his first 18 months in Toronto, on Bedford Ave. However, the couple eventually broke up. TB briefly recounts a story about a visit to Buffalo with some other gay men that led to animosity between the men. TB mentions animosity with Ricky Tick, due to a love affair with a man who Ricky Tick’s close friend was in love with. TB states ‘you had to be careful whose toes you stepped on”. TB feels that ‘those people can’t see that what is attractive to a [gay] man, is a man’ - TB feels strongly that you should dress manly to be attractive to other men. TB refers to the King Edward the “Gollywag Room” - and does not consider it a gay bar. The Ford Hotel Beverage Rooms (two of them, one with entertainment and cocktail lounge, the other with beer - were semi-gay as they were near the bus terminal). Similar is true for the ‘KCR” - King Cole Room. TB feels that Letros was unique, as it was essentially a gay bar. TB briefly discusses cruisy bathrooms around the city, including the Royal York, the Bandstand washrooms at the Queens Park, and an on-campus public bathroom that was torn down in the late 50s, and various bathrooms at the University of Toronto. Also mentions the Toronto Dominion building, and the washrooms at Bloor and Yonge (although TB notes that they cart out about ‘eight a day there’ and feels you’d have to be stupid to cruise there). Dates and locations discussed: Toronto, 1950s, 1960s, 1970s, 1980s
Access Restrictions
N/A
Location - Original
CLGA only in possession of digital copy. Cassette tape retained by Lionel Collier
Description Level
Item
Less detail

Foolscap Gay Oral History with Tony Brady (tape 2 of 3)

https://arquives.andornot.com/en/permalink/descriptions30865
Collection
Archives
Part Of
Foolscap Gay Oral History Project fonds
Description Level
Item
Date Range
26-2-1986
Scope and Content
SIDE C: TB begins to recount a trip down to Miami, where him, his father and brother booked into the Club Baths. Upon discovery that it was a gay place, his father was ‘floored’. TB had a very nice stay there on another trip, felt that in the steambaths one would not meet the wrong person. TB recou…
Collection
Archives
Material Type
Sound recording
Date Range
26-2-1986
Part Of
Foolscap Gay Oral History Project fonds
Fonds Number
F0083
Series Number
2
File Number
F0083-02-020
Item Number
2017-059/026
Digitized Media Type
WAV file
Physical Condition
audio good
Scope and Content
SIDE C: TB begins to recount a trip down to Miami, where him, his father and brother booked into the Club Baths. Upon discovery that it was a gay place, his father was ‘floored’. TB had a very nice stay there on another trip, felt that in the steambaths one would not meet the wrong person. TB recounts another story while in London, stating that they did not have gay bars but rather clubs, where gay men would have to pay membership to drink with other gay men. TB also noted many people were very self-conscious, and would not have gay men over. Also, despite having lots of pubs, there were no real fully gay pubs. TB found it very difficult to find other gay men. While in Paris, TB visited Maurice’s Bar, which had a series of ceramic penises and little images of Mussolini having sex with Hitler. TB briefly discusses gay theatres in Toronto - Rio, Broadview, Bay and Biltmore (sp?), and court costs for lawyers. TB mentions being asked by the police if he was gay or not, and then searched until they found a bottle of poppers on him - but they did not know what poppers were. TB was still sent to jail. TB says he can see through the veneer of the police’s socialization, straight to the bully underneath. TB briefly mentions a transsexual sex worker friend of his, Michelle, who was arrested on revenue charges. Michelle has a grey Cadillac, with a Yorkshire Terrier. Lionel recognized her, and mentions that she is gorgeous. TB mentions Hislop was much more femme earlier in his life, despite now being ‘the butch type’. TB states he has never felt guilty about being gay, and, despite feeling slight dissonance between his queerness and his religion, as soon as he found a sense of community, he let it all go. TB also mentioned briefly getting involved in the Occult, and a particular visitations and experiences. TB’s physician was a psychiatrist, and noted that he was keeping track of all of TB’s little relationship issues, etc. However, TB has never directly seen a psychiatrist. While TB never did drag, he took getting into costume very seriously and won various awards for this. TB did a show at the 511, which was written by folks at CHUM radio station, but TB fell sick with pneumonia. At one time, TB was going to participate in a mime version of My Fair Lady at 511 (one of a series of shows), but TB did not follow it through. TB briefly discusses HIV/AIDS. He mentions that HIV/AIDS is like a “meningitis” - affecting peoples balance and how people can be infected. TB particularly emphasizes that HIV/AIDS is insidious because of how one cannot know when it will begin to affect the positive person. Dates and locations discussed: Miami, London, England, Paris, Toronto, 1960s, 1970s, 1980s SIDE D: TB believes lesbians are more inclined to commit suicide than gay men, and believes that their relationships are more ‘sado-masochistic’. Tony also summarizes his experiences and relationships with straight men, and a discussion on passibility. TB refers to ‘flamboyant’ men as ‘clowns’. In the early 50s, Centre Island is ‘where we all went’, Tony says. Tony also discusses a couple anecdotal stories about glory holes. TB used to go to New York often, and stayed in the Sloane House, while his family lived in Connecticut. TB tells a few stories about bars in New York. TB continues to discuss effeminate gay men in various cities he has lived in.TB also discusses intravenous drugs and illness, and why women might be getting ill more often than others in Africa, and why he does not believe that bisexual people are the cause. TB believes there are more hustlers at time of interview than before because of changing economic circumstances and also a changed ‘morality’. Tony discusses pedophilia and ‘having the need to molest children’ as a tragedy. He compares the experience to having to hide your sexuality as a queer person. He brings up pyromaniacs as well, and says there is also ‘no cure’ for this, but it is tragic that you have to destroy things to be happy. TB notes that while the gay village was always in the downtown core, it spread now to Cabbagetown (which he calls Cab-ahge Vill-ahge, in a "French" accent) and Danforth. TB briefly discusses the history of Cabbagetown. Tony notes that most gay men thought of themselves as criminals, and would feel guilty if they saw policeman. Tony, in the late 60s, remembers being caught walking down the street with another man by the police, and was forced to walk in an open direction from the other man. Tony also had a friend who was locked away in a treatment for sexual perversion for being gay. Dates and locations discussed: Toronto, New York, South Africa, 1960s, 1970s, 1980s
Access Restrictions
N/A
Location - Original
CLGA only in possession of digital copy. Cassette tape retained by Lionel Collier
Description Level
Item
Less detail

Foolscap Gay Oral History with Tony Brady (tape 3 of 3)

https://arquives.andornot.com/en/permalink/descriptions30866
Collection
Archives
Part Of
Foolscap Gay Oral History Project fonds
Description Level
Item
Date Range
26-2-1986
Scope and Content
SIDE E: TB continues to recount the story of two straight teens who were experimenting with each other, and caught by their landlord and sent to prison. Then, TB recounts another story of a man having sex with young boys who was arrested and sent to prison. Then, another story about a friend of his…
Collection
Archives
Material Type
Sound recording
Date Range
26-2-1986
Part Of
Foolscap Gay Oral History Project fonds
Fonds Number
F0083
Series Number
2
File Number
F0083-02-020
Item Number
2017-059/027
Digitized Media Type
WAV file
Physical Condition
audio good
Scope and Content
SIDE E: TB continues to recount the story of two straight teens who were experimenting with each other, and caught by their landlord and sent to prison. Then, TB recounts another story of a man having sex with young boys who was arrested and sent to prison. Then, another story about a friend of his who really badly beaten up by a man whom he brought home from Cornelius as a sexual partner. Tony feels the work that he has done has never been the type of work that gays would be discriminated against for, but he believes there is a high level of discrimination toward gay men in the workplace. Tony says it is unfortunate that Hislop does not have a better reputation or image amongst gay men, and he feels that its because gay men do not take themselves seriously. TB notes the importance of HIV/AIDS and police entrapment at the Bathhouse raids allowed gay men to know that they don’t deserve this, and triggered a new sense of taking themselves seriously. Tony discusses in great depth his views on George Hislop’s abilities as a leader, and questions where he is not ‘too out’. Tony also discusses the gays being ‘more interested in everything,’ with the qualifier ‘once you get past the bar crowd’. Regarding the occult, he mentions he has never been to a straight seance, but he has been to a lot of gay seances. He also brings up the celebrities of gay cultures, and how they are usually middle-aged women, but not men. Lionel believes it is about the sensitivity and the beauty about men. Dates and locations discussed: 1970s, 1980s, Toronto
Access Restrictions
N/A
Location - Original
CLGA only in possession of digital copy. Cassette tape retained by Lionel Collier
Description Level
Item
Less detail

99047 records – page 2 of 4953.